Adults with Autism

From Nowhere to “Know Where”: Transition to Adult Services

By the Utah Parent Center

What is in store for youth with disabilities after they leave school? What will happen to your child when they no longer receive the educational services or accommodations which have been mandated by federal law? These questions are important to all parents of youth with special needs, and even though disabilities may vary greatly in their severity or impact, the need to plan for the future is very important.  he Utah Parent Center has a collection of fact sheets and a user-friendly parent handbook on preparing your child to transition to adult services. Learn more today!

Social Skills Groups for Adolescents and Adults

Social Skills Groups For Youth with Autism Spectrum and Related Disorders at the Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health Clinics
(650 Komas Dr. #208, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

Summer Leisure Group for Youth: This is a weekly group for youth ages 8 to 13 on Wednesdays from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. from the end of May through August. Activities include building and racing boats, games that build teamwork skills, and outings. Call or email Jubel Morgan, R.N. for more information at: (801) 587-3775 or jubel.morgan@hsc.utah.edu.

Youth Group For children ages 8 to 13, this group meets on Wednesdays each week from September through May. The group runs from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. Activities address a wide range of social skills that group members build through games, hands-on activities and direct instruction. Call or email Jubel Morgan, R.N. for more information at (801) 587-3775 or jubel.morgan@hsc.utah.edu.

Adolescent Groups: These groups are aimed at adolescents ages 13 to 18 and run from September until May. For the 2012-2013 year, we will be starting an adolescent Girls’ Group to focus on topics of interest relevant to them. We will continue our Boys’ Group. Group sessions alternate weekly be-tween age-appropriate community outings and lessons in our offices using role playing and other hands-on activities. Weekly meetings last from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. The 2012-2013 cost is currently un-der discussion and will be determined by early July. To obtain more information or sign up, call (801) 587-8020.

The Jordan Family Education Center is offering a second round of Confident, Successful & Independent: A Group for Young Adults with High Functioning Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome (Ages 17 thru 21) (Enrollment Limited) starting on November 1. Located in River’s Edge School, 319 West 11000 South, South Jordan Linda Jessie-Jones; Christine Winward Tuesdays 7:00 – 9:00 p.m This is a class to help teenagers and young adults ages 17-21 with High Functioning Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome to transition to independence. It will focus on self-esteem, anxiety, relationships, seeking employment, college, survival skills, and career choices. To Register, call 801-565-7442.

Transition Guides

Transition Tool Kit developed by Autism Speaks

Transition Guide developed by Organization for Autism Research

Transition Undefined by Autism After 16

NICHCY’s Transition Summary series, Resources for Adults with Disabilities, focuses on preparing youth with disabilities to move from high school to the adult world.

Services for Adults with Disabilities
This publication helps adults with disabilities identify organizations and agencies designed to assist with their specific concerns and needs, such as employment, postsecondary education, recreation, independent living, and assistive technology. October 2010

Transition Planning: A Team Effort (TS10) PDF
This Transition Summary provides ideas and information on how students, families, school personnel, service providers, and others can work together to help students make a smooth transition. In particular, this document focuses on creative transition planning and services that use all the resources that exist in communities, not just the agencies that have traditionally been involved. 1999, Resources Updated 2002, 24 pages.
The information above is courtesy of the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities.

Videos

What to do at 22?
As young adults reach age 22 most families want to celebrate. But for families with an autistic child, a 22nd birthday can be a time of great stress. That’s because some needed services may no longer be available to their child as they “age out” of the system. The one hour film “Autism: Coming of Age” explores the hopes, fears and challenges of parents raising children with autism. A documentary on UEN.

Peter Gerhardt, Ed.D. – Transitions to Adulthood for Learners with ASD
Today, professionals, families and learners with ASD are beginning to redefine the outcomes of the transition process beyond simple job placement to focus on career development and measures of personal competence and life satisfaction. To this end, this presentation will provide an overview and practical suggestions for transition planning AT ANY AGE in support of desirable and individualized employment outcomes with attention to assessment, community based training, employment development, job-related social skills, and quality of life concerns.

Becoming Leaders for Tomorrow (BLT) Youth Leadership Toolkit

By BLT, Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University

The young adults on the BLT Advisory Committee told them that they should provide training on other topics, like leadership, self-advocacy, social skills, transportation, and more. So BLT made more videos (nearly 2 hours) of young adults sharing their hints and tips for other youth and young adults; parents; doctors; and other professionals. They also made a guide book to go with the videos/DVD. The guide book is for facilitators and provides some background and several discussion points and questions to use during training event.  Find out how to get your copy of the Toolkit.

Resources for College & University Students with Disabilities

Dixie State Disability Resource Center is dedicated to providing students with disabilities the opportunity to achieve their post-secondary educational goal through accessible services.

ASAN’s Navigating College
Run by and for Autistic people, ASAN was created to provide support and services to individuals on the autism spectrum while working to educate communities and improve public perceptions of autism. The handbook and corresponding website, Navigating College, is a first-of-its-kind resource written by autistic adults for autistic college students exploring the various aspects of the higher education experience.

Brigham Young University
University Accessibility Center
1520 Wilkinson Center
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
(801) 422-2767

College of Eastern Utah
Disability Resource Center
College of Eastern Utah
451 East 400 North
Price, Utah 84501
(435) 613-5806

Dixie State College
Disability Resource Center
Edith Whitehead Building
Student Services Center
Counseling and Advisement Room 201
225 South 700 East
St. George, Utah 84770
(435)-652-7516

Salt Lake Community College
Disability Resource Center
4600 So. Redwood Road
Salt Lake City, Utah 84123
(801) 957-4659

Snow College
Accessibility Resource Center
Snow College
150 E. College Avenue
Ephraim, UT 84627
(435) 283-7321

Southern Utah University
Disability Support Center
(435) 865-8022

University of Utah
Center for Disability Services
162 Union Building
200 South Central Campus Drive
Room #162
Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-9107
(801) 581-5020

Utah State University
Disability Resource Center
0101 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322-0101
(435) 797-2444

Utah Valley State College
Accessibility Services
Business Building (WB 126)
Utah Valley State College
800 West University Parkway
Orem, UT 84058
(801) 863-8747

Weber State University
Services for Students with Disabilities
1129 University Circle
Ogden, UT 84408-1129
(801) 626-6413

Westminster College
START Center
1840 South 1300 East
Salt Lake City, UT 84105
(801) 832-2280